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COVID-19 Vaccine Information 

While the decision to be vaccinated is personal, we encourage you to make an informed decision. Reid commits to providing you with information from trusted, verifiable sources such as the CDC and FDA.

It is important to know there are proven medical benefits to vaccination. According to a study published by the CDC in September 2021 (source), between June - August of 2021, unvaccinated patients were 10x more likely to require hospitalization and 11x more likely to succumb to their illness than those who were vaccinated.

We will continue to provide the latest updates on vaccination as information is made available.

Where to get Vaccinated

Reid Health offers several locations where you can receive the free COVID-19 vaccine. Anyone 5 years and older* is eligible to be vaccinated. A parent or legal guardian must be present and a signature is required to vaccinate a minor.

* Only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved for those who are 5-17 years old.

To register for your vaccination:

Indiana - County Health Department Contact Information

Ohio - County Health Department Contact Information

Additional Locations

Reid Health Main Campus

  • Lingle Grand Hall
  • Walk-ins available
  • Appointments can be scheduled at: Indiana State Vaccine Scheduling Site
  • Phone number: (765) 965-4200
  • Address: 1100 Reid Parkway
  • Vaccination hours: 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday
  • Vaccine available: Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson
  • Who can be vaccinated here: Ages 5 and up

Reid Pediatric & Internal Medicine

  • Address: 1485 Chester Blvd.
  • Phone number: (765) 966-5527
  • Vaccine available: Pfizer
  • Who can be vaccinated here: Ages 5 and up

Reid Health Residency Clinic

  • Address: 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway
  • Phone number: (765) 966-5949
  • Vaccine available: Pfizer
  • Who can be vaccinated here: Ages 12 and up

Reid OB/GYN - Richmond

  • Address: 1050 Reid Parkway Suite 220
  • Phone number: (765) 962-9541
  • Vaccine available: Pfizer
  • Who can be vaccinated here: Ages 12 and up

Reid Primary & Specialty Care - Cambridge City

  • Address: 1154 South State Road 1
  • Phone number: (765) 478-6108
  • Vaccine available: Pfizer
  • Who can be vaccinated here: Ages 12 and up

Whitewater Valley Primary Care

  • Address: 1473 East State Road 44, Connersville
  • Phone number: (765) 827-5693
  • Vaccine available: Pfizer
  • Who can be vaccinated here: Ages 12 and up

Questions about scheduling? Call the COVID-19 Hotline.

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Which COVID-19 Vaccine is Right for You?

Here's a breakdown of each vaccine -- Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson -- including information about who's eligible to get each one, how many doses you'll need, how each works, and more.

Vaccine

Pfizer

  • Who can get it? Anyone 5 years and older
  • How many shots do you need? Two, given 21 days apart for most people. Those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should get a third shot at least 28 days after their second.
  • When are you considered fully vaccinated? Two weeks after your second dose
  • How does it work? The vaccine uses mRNA to give instructions to your cells about how to make a harmless spike protein that is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19. The spike protein triggers your body's immune response, allowing it to build immunity against the virus. Once the instructions are passed on, your cells get rid of the mRNA. It never enters the nucleus of the cells where the DNA resides.
  • Will I need a booster? Booster shots are recommended for anyone 18 and older. The booster shot should come at least six months after the second.
  • Has it been fully approved by the FDA? The FDA has given the Pfizer vaccine full approval for those 18 and older. It remains available under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for those ages 5-17.

Moderna

  • Who can get it? Anyone 18 years and older
  • How many shots do you need? Two, given 28 days apart for most people. However, as with the Pfizer vaccine, those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should get a third dose at least 28 days after their second.
  • When are you considered fully vaccinated? Two weeks after your second dose
  • How does it work? The Moderna vaccine uses the same mRNA technology as Pfizer's.
  • Will I need a booster? Booster shots are recommended for anyone 18 and older. The booster shot should come at least six months after the second.
  • Has it been fully approved by the FDA? Not yet. It remains available for use under an EUA.

Johnson & Johnson

  • Who can get it? Anyone 18 years and older
  • How many shots do you need? One. Johnson & Johnson has not been given approval for an additional does for those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised.
  • When are you considered fully vaccinated? Two weeks after your shot
  • How does it work? Johnson & Johnson's vaccine is a viral vector vaccine. It operates in much the same way as Pfizer's and Moderna's except instead of using mRNA to deliver the instructions for making the COVID-19 spike protein, Johnson & Johnson's vaccine uses a modified version of a different virus. Like the other vaccines, the material does not integrate into a person's DNA.
  • Will I need a booster? Booster shots are recommended for anyone 18 and older.
  • Has it been fully approved by the FDA? Not yet. It remains available for use under an EUA.

Background on Boosters

The CDC has provided information on who is eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot. They report that "emerging evidence shows that among healthcare and other frontline workers, vaccine effectiveness against COVID-19 infections is decreasing over time. This lower effectiveness is likely due to the combination of decreasing protection as time passes since getting vaccinated (e.g., waning immunity) as well as the greater infectiousness of the Delta variant."

The COVID-19 vaccine booster shot is an effective way to provide added protection against the virus.

Who needs a booster shot?

  • Anyone 18 years and older

When should I get my booster shot?

Those who had the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines initially should wait at least six months before getting a booster. Johnson & Johnson recipients should get their booster at least two months after the initial dose.

You can mix and match boosters.

Use this chart to find out if you are eligible for a booster shot and if so, when you should get it. (Click image to expand)

The FDA and CDC have approved using a mix-and-match approach to COVID-19 vaccination booster shots, allowing all those who are eligible to get a booster dose to choose whichever vaccine they would like for that extra dose.

Third dose

The CDC recommends people with moderately to severely compromised immune systems receive an additional dose of the same mRNA vaccine at least 28 days after their second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. The additional dose is intended to improve immunocompromised people's response to their initial vaccine series.

What is the difference between a booster shot and a third does shot?

Third dose vaccine shots are for Pfizer and Moderna recipients who are moderately to severely immunocompromised. This includes those who are actively receiving cancer treatments, have received an organ transplant or are taking medication to suppress the immune system, received a stem cell transplant within the past two years, have moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome), advanced or untreated HIV infection, and active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that might suppress the immune system.

The third dose should be received at least 28 days after the second.

What side effects can I expect from the booster shot?

The side effects of the booster shot are similar to those of the second COVID-19 vaccine dose. Reactions reported include fatigue and pain at the injection site. Most side effects were mild to moderate.

Additional questions?

If you have additional questions about the COVID-19 vaccine booster shot, please contact the COVID-19 Hotline by calling (765) 965-4200.

FAQs

What are the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine?

  • Side effects such as headaches, fever, and muscle pains have been reported. These are normal signs that your body is reacting as it should and building protection. Some people experience no side effects at all, but for those who do, the effects usually go away within a few days. Serious side effects that could cause long-term health problems are extremely unlikely, but we know some who become ill with COVID-19 continue to feel its effects long after they’ve “recovered.” Even if you were to experience side effects from vaccination that are less than mild, that risk outweighs the possibility for severe complications, hospital, or death the comes from contracting COVID-19.

People are still testing positive for COVID-19 after receiving the vaccine.  Does it work?

  • The COVID-19 vaccine greatly reduce your risks of infection, hospitalization, and death. Although it is effective at preventing most infections, the vaccine – like most other vaccines – is not foolproof. A small percentage of breakthrough infections were expected and have happened. Where the vaccines have been most impressive is in their ability to lessen the severity of symptoms for those who become infected even after being fully vaccinated. Data from the Indiana Department of Health shows much less than 1% of fully vaccinated people have had a breakthrough infection, and the numbers are far lower for hospitalizations and deaths.

Does the COVID-19 vaccine cause infertility?

  • The COVID-19 vaccine will not affect fertility or menstrual cycles. The vaccine encourages the body to fight a spike protein specific to the virus. False posts on social media claimed getting the COVID-19 vaccine would cause a woman's body to fight a different spike protein (syncitin-1) and impact her fertility. The two spike proteins are completely distinct, and getting the COVID-19 vaccine will not affect the fertility of women who are seeking to become pregnant, including through in vitro fertilization methods. The vaccine also won’t affect a woman’s menstrual cycle, but infections – such as becoming ill from COVID-19 – can.

Was the vaccine rushed through the approval process?

  • The vaccines were tested in large clinical trials for which tens of thousands of people of different ages, races, and ethnicities with different medical conditions were recruited to participate. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reviews all safety data from trials and only issues an Emergency Use Authorization when the expected benefits outweigh the potential risks. The CDC has an independent group of experts who review all the safety data that comes in as vaccinations are administered. If a problem is found, immediate action is taken to determine if the issue is related to the vaccine and to decide the best course of action. More than 363 million vaccine doses had been given in the United States through Aug. 23, 2021. To date, only two serious side effects after vaccination have been found, and both are rare. Those are anaphylaxis and thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) after vaccination with the Johnson & Johnson product. Side effects that could cause long-term health problems are extremely unlikely following any vaccination, including for COVID-19. Throughout the history of vaccines, side effects generally have happened within six weeks of receiving a dose. For that reason, the FDA required the COVID-19 vaccine to be studied for at least two months (eight weeks) after the final dose. Millions of people have received the vaccine, and no long-term side effects have been detected.

Am I immune if I've already had COVID-19?

  • Although your body will develop immunity to COVID after you become infected, how long that immunity lasts remains unclear. There’s evidence that better protection comes from being fully vaccinated. One study showed unvaccinated people who already had COVID are more than two times as likely than fully vaccinated people to get it again.

Do mRNA COVID vaccines change your DNA?

  • The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are the first to use messenger RNA (mRNA), but researchers have been studying the technology for decades, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Previous work has been done on potential mRNA vaccines for flu, Zika, rabies, and more. mRNA also has been used to trigger the immune system to target specific cancer cells. Traditional vaccines put a weakened or inactive virus in the body, but mRNA vaccines teach cells how to make a harmless protein unique to the virus that triggers the immune system. That response then produces antibodies and provides protection from getting infected by exposure to the real virus. In other words, the vaccine makes the body falsely believe it has been exposed to COVID-19 to trigger cells to react and produce the crucial antibodies that will protect against an actual virus infection. The process takes a few weeks to accumulate enough antibodies to help protect a person from getting the disease. Soon after the harmless protein is made, the cells break down the mRNA instructions and get rid of them. The mRNA never enters the nucleus of the cells where the DNA is kept nor interacts with the DNA in any way.

Is it safe to take the vaccine if I have an underlying medical condition, or I am pregnant?

  • A number of underlying medical conditions – including those such as cancer; heart, kidney, liver, or lung disease; diabetes; pregnancy; obesity; and more – can increase the likelihood that you could get seriously ill from COVID-19. For that reason, vaccinations are encouraged for most people with underlying conditions. Talk with your primary care provider about your particular situation to make sure vaccination is right for you.

Additional Blog Resources

COVID-19 patient levels climbing once again at Reid Health Hospital

Getting vaccinated for COVID-19 helps slow appearance of new variants

COVID-19 vaccine booster shots now available for anyone 18 years and up

Get Your Questions Answered

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Reid Health
1100 Reid Parkway
Richmond, IN 47374
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